Writer Interview Series with Kayla Hollatz

Writers don't need to accept the limitations others try to put on them. Kayla Hollatz shares how she came to find her writing voice and how she learned to share it confidently.

Being a writer means you get to create amazing stories and maybe even inspire others in some way. Creativity and imagination have no limits--unless you allow yourself to be limited. Unlike many writers, Kayla Hollatz began her writing journey with the understanding she did not have to be limited by the opinions of others. She embraced her journey with confidence. She knew she wanted to write, so she did! If you're still struggling with the decision to pursue writing at a greater level, then you NEED to listen to the interview below!

Some of my takeaways from this interview include:

"Your voice can develop a whole lot more once you experiment with different types [of writing]." -Kayla Hollatz

When you start to brand yourself online as a writer, there's a certain pressure to have all your ducks in a row. Everyone wants to know: What kind of writer are you? Who do you write for? Why do you write? All of these questions swirl around our minds like swirled white and milk chocolate chips--but without the sweet aftertaste. Many of us make our writing public because we want to share a piece of ourselves with the world. We may even want to document our travels or parenting tales. Yet, before (intentional) branding and monetizing occur, I think every writer should give herself permission to experiment with different genres and styles of writing. Experimenting can stretch your creativity and over time, you learn the answers to those questions and can respond confidently.

"Being rooted first in my own voice really helped me before I started to write in the voice of someone else." -Kayla Hollatz

I'm not a copywriter or content creator, but this line of thinking completely makes sense. Phenomenal copywriters and content creators must know who they are as writers before attempting to help someone with their brand. Otherwise, you leave the door open for confusion, envy and comparison to enter. We must give ourselves permission to learn who we are as writers, and be okay in what makes us unique. 

"I think we can get so caught up in titles." -Kayla Hollatz

We often forget that titles are man-made. What I mean is, yes, titles can identify what you do; however, it is never okay to belittle yourself because you don't have the same title as someone else. You are not less of a writer because you don't have X amount of followers, likes, or comments. A writer friend of mine looked up Natalie Baszile, the author of Queen Sugar on Instagram. To her surprise, this renown writer has a little less than 1000 followers on Instagram. Does that diminish her worth? Did that stop her phenomenal book from becoming a television show? I hope you responded with a resounding "NO!" It is my hope that we will focus on what matters most, friend. Don't hang onto number counts for dear life. Focus on your why. Focus on how you can best help your readers.  


What about you? What were your takeaways from watching this interview? Share them below in the comments!

Don't forget, follow Kayla on Twitter and Instagram and support her by grabbing a copy of her poetry book, Brave Little Bones on Amazon. You can also check out her copywriting, brand strategy and content creation services at www.kaylahollatz.com